Strength of Evidence Podcast #1

Podcast

This was long overdue. Strength of Evidence Podcast (iTunes, Facebook) – a skeptical fitness podcast. Jon Fass, who you may know as a co-host of the Fitcast & Bret Contreras teamed up to take a look at at what the strength & conditioning, rehabilitation, fitness research really says. Topics: Evidence based decision making Hierarchy of Knowledge Logical Fallacies the Placebo Effect Where Research […]

Doping: Supervision Instead of Bans

Doping: Supervision Instead of Ban

This was a good read. Current (article is from 2007) anti-doping policy: a critical appraisal. The authors took a look at common anit-doping arguments: the level playing field argument protecting the athlete’s health the concern for professional integrity the concern about unnecessary risk taking and come to the conclusion that: We believe that current anti-doping does […]

Examine.com Supplement Resource

examine_logo

Have you recently taken a look at Examine.com? It’s been a while since I first mentioned the supplement wiki. And it has grown quite a bit. Here for example is the entry on fish oil. Also, one of the creators, Silverhydra, offered some interesting insights he got, putting the fish oil page together.

Iron Radio #147 – Big Eats

Listen to Episode 147 of IronRadio. Topics: Science News, BIG EATS How maximum strength relates to your ability to do physical work (link to study) How many sets translate into maximum muscle protein synthesis (link to study) Download: link to mp3 (right click + ‘save as’)

After Workout Massages

A study published by Canadian researchers in Science Translational Medicine confirmed what many athletes already knew. Study: “Massage Therapy Attenuates Inflammatory Signaling After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage” intense bicycle training one thigh was massaged one muscle for 10 minutes then they took tissue samples from both thighs and compared them Result: massaged thigh had lower inflammatory markers increased […]

Athlete vs. Couch Potato Quadriceps MRI Scan

Athlete vs Couch Potato MRI

Check out this astonishing image. Via: Chronic Exercise Preserves Lean Muscle Mass in Masters Athletes Typical quadriceps MRI scan of a 40-year-old triathlete compared with the quadriceps MRI scans of a 70-year-old triathlete and a 74-year-old sedentary man. Note the significant visual difference between the SCAT and IMAT of the sedentary man versus masters athletes.