Dmitry Klokov’s Home Gym

(Post was oiginally published Jan 17, 2012)

Update 2.8.2013: Dmitry Uploaded a tour of his house.

Translation from Vadim:

This is his father’s house, somewhere in Moscow suburbia. His father, Vyatcheslav Klokov, is a 1983 world champion (-110kg, 192.5/247.5), and ex-president of the Russian Weightlifting Federation.

Klokov announced that in a couple of days from now, Koklyaev is going to pay him a visit here, in this residence. They’re going to train together, go to sauna, eat shashlyk (shishkebab) and, as usual, film another episode of Klokov’s interview show.

Pools: 1 indoor warm pool, 1 cold outdoor pool, 1 pond. The outdoor pool is never drained for winter. When it freezes over, they drill a hole in it and dive in the freezing water after sauna — common Russian tradition. Also, Dmitry’s father forced him to dive there every winter morning before going to school, to build character.

The pond is never drained either, and is used as a small hockey rink in wintertime.
There is also a guest house, suitable for up to 15 people.

Original Post:

Here is a visit to Dmitry Klokov’s home.

It’s in Russian, so maybe some of you could give a quick summary of what he says [read the update below]. But I think he also talks about Arnold being one of his heros/idols.

Looks like he has a nice home gym going on.

Of course he has an Oly platform at home. You’ll see him doing deadlifts, bench presses, overhead presses and curls. Yes, he does curls too.

Have fun watching. In the meantime I’ll be doing 21’s in the squat rack.

Update: Huge thanks to Brandon who translated what was being said in the video. Here is what he wrote:

Introduces him as a family man; in fact dedicated his Beijing silver to his mother, wife, and daughter (all seen within the opening scenes of the video). Wife talks about how nice it is to have him working from home, but says that the novelty of having the good-looking man around that everyone else wants wears off.

Mother at table discusses what it is like to be married to a weight lifter, as her husband practiced the same sport. For her husband, there is nothing “special”, as soon as he gets off the plan he always analyzes everything for how he could have done better, no matter if he got a gold, silver, or whatever.

Dmitry setting up weights, narrator explains that his father, Vyechaslav, became the world-champion weight lifter in 1983, Dmitry repeated his father’s success in 2005. So in the gym with Dmitry and in the office with Vyechaslav, we asked what to world champions argue about when it comes to weight lifting. The home gym was set up by his father, Vyechaslav, who helped him learn what “have-to” means early (as a child).
Father begins to explain: a child who engages in any sport, hockey, soccer, weights, doesn’t matter, he has to psychologically learn to overcome himself above all else; then the child is not required to be controlled by someone else. Vyacheslav was actually categorically opposed to his son following his path of becoming a world champion, but that turned out to be Dmitry’s fate (destiny).

Lifts up weights and says that his best weight for this exercise is “170” [presumably kilograms]. Dmitry likes to joke: “playing chess is the most dangerous sport out there, you can fall asleep and poke out your eye when you fall forward.”
Dmitry started training alone in 2005, a risky choice according to his father. At one point when lifting more than 250, the weight went behind his shoulder…he should have dropped it since this was just a training round, but he held on and tore his muscle a bit. As a trainer I was concerned about whether he had sustained lasting trauma.

Dmitry then goes on to state that he was making real progress training alone, and once he blew past 442 kilograms a year after that decision, because it was such a large sum and created a significant gap between him and others, at that point all questions objections fell away.
Dmitry still experiences the pain of his injury, which makes each new medal he earns that much more valuable to him. No matter how you look at it, one big accomplishment for him was beating the record of his father. “My best weight was 442 kilograms, 2 kg more than my dad.
Dmitry had one additional example outside of his father: Arnold Schwarzenegger. “Some people would say he’s my idol; I prefer to think he’s someone whose example I’d like to follow“. Arnold’s full suite of accomplishments: weight-lifting, acting, business success, and political activity all greatly encourage Dmitry.

In 2005 Dmitry participated in the championship “Arnold’s Class”, the photographs of which he treasures, as he does the other photographs of his sports success. “At the end of my sports career, I want to do some large reprints of my photos of my key accomplishments in frames. Behind the glass display I want my uniform, medals, and photos.”

Between Dmitry and Arnold do exist substantial differences. “Let’s understand what it means to be a “lifter”; it’s someone who lifts…I don’t just “lift”. The most important difference between them is that Arnold in his practice of culture could become whatever he wanted to, but not an olympic champion. The winner of the Beijing silver in 2012 is going for an Olympic gold.

  • Gilbert Michaud

    and great physique too

  • Bogyc465

    actually, he says he doesn't like the curls. i speak russian, he makes the gesture, but says he isn't a bodybuilder.

  • GregorATG

    What? Blasphemy!! Who doesn't like curls? :)

  • BH

    Here are some brief notes (translated):

    Introduces him as a family man; in fact dedicated his Beijing silver to his mother, wife, and daughter (all seen within the opening scenes of the video). Wife talks about how nice it is to have him working from home, but says that the novelty of having the good-looking man around that everyone else wants wears off.

    Mother at table discusses what it is like to be married to a weight lifter, as her husband practiced the same sport. For her husband, there is nothing “special”, as soon as he gets off the plan he always analyzes everything for how he could have done better, no matter if he got a gold, silver, or whatever.

    Dmitri setting up weights, narrator explains that his father, Vyechaslav, became the world-champion weight lifter in 1983, Dmitri repeated his father’s success in 2005. So in the gym with Dmitri and in the office with Vyechaslav, we asked what to world champions argue about when it comes to weight lifting. The home gym was set up by his father, Vyechaslav, who helped him learn what “have-to” means early (as a child).
    Father begins to explain: a child who engages in any sport, hockey, soccer, weights, doesn’t matter, he has to psychologically learn to overcome himself above all else; then the child is not required to be controlled by someone else. Vyacheslav was actually categorically opposed to his son following his path of becoming a world champion, but that turned out to be Dmitri’s fate (destiny).

    Lifts up weights and says that his best weight for this exercise is “170” [presumably kilograms]. Dmitri likes to joke: “playing chess is the most dangerous sport out there, you can fall asleep and poke out your eye when you fall forward.”
    Dmitri started training alone in 2005, a risky choice according to his father. At one point when lifting more than 250, the weight went behind his shoulder…he should have dropped it since this was just a training round, but he held on and tore his muscle a bit. As a trainer I was concerned about whether he had sustained lasting trauma.

    Dmitri then goes on to state that he was making real progress training alone, and once he blew past 442 kilograms a year after that decision, because it was such a large sum and created a significant gap between him and others, at that point all questions objections fell away.
    Dmitri still experiences the pain of his injury, which makes each new medal he earns that much more valuable to him. No matter how you look at it, one big accomplishment for him was beating the record of his father. “My best weight was 442 kilograms, 2 kg more than my dad.
    Dmitri had one additional example outside of his father: Arnold Schwarzenegger. “Some people would say he’s my idol; I prefer to think he’s someone whose example I’d like to follow”. Arnold’s full suite of accomplishments: weight-lifting, acting, business success, and political activity all greatly encourage Dmitri.

    In 2005 Dmitri participated in the championship “Arnold’s Class”, the photographs of which he treasures, as he does the other photographs of his sports success. “At the end of my sports career, I want to do some large reprints of my photos of my key accomplishments in frames. Behind the glass display I want my uniform, medals, and photos.”

    Between Dmitri and Arnold do exist substantial differences. “Let’s understand what it means to be a “lifter”; it’s someone who lifts…I don’t just “lift”. The most important difference between them is that Arnold in his practice of culture could become whatever he wanted to, but not an olympic champion. The winner of the Beijing silver in 2012 is going for an Olympic gold.

    • GregorATG

      Can’t thank you enough Brandon. Thanks for taking the time to write that.

  • Jay Blais

    that is like an episode of mtv cribs! No weightlifter in the US lives like that lol

  • Aaron

    Damn, thats a pretty fantastic house. On a side note, I’ve been wondering for a while now why he seems to favor nearly straight leg deadlifts. I understand that lower back and hamstring strength is developed like none other with that style of deadlift, but they seem out of place for an oly lifter like Klokov. His hips are even higher than the much more hip dominant powerlifter style deadlifts. As in, if you look at his snatch or C&J, he is practically in full squat at the start. Anyone have any info on why he favors that style of deadlift over something that would mimic the competition pulls more?

    • Roger

      Pattern interference? Just throwing it out there.

    • Leon

      He might simply work on a weakness by focussing on the lower back.

      But as I noted elsewhere before I find it difficult to judge his trainig by some
      youtube clips. Maybe he does a ton of pulls, but they are just too boring to show.

  • Igor Belopolsky

    That house is worth a couple million, easily. Not surprised, either

  • anonymous

    I am russian ,now live in usa nyc. And woundering how on earth did klokov get so rich from weightlifting.
    Weightlifting don’t pay much in Russia either, but he’s so wealthy by look of his house.
    Just wow ..
    Can anyone explain me how he got so rich?
    Is it he’s parents money?